Dictionnary
Here you will find a quick definition of some technical terms.
Class: A class is a collection of individuals or objects characterized by the same properties. There is, for example, a class for "Person", "Geographical Place", "Group", etc.
Entity: Entities are concrete applications or instances of classes. For example, Joe Biden is an entity of the class "Person". And "Amsterdam" is an entity of the class "Geographical Place".
FAIR: The FAIR principles are designed to ensure the re-usability of research data. Learn here more about them and how Geovistory applies the FAIR principles.
Ontology: An ontology is a way of representing knowledge in a form hat can be used for searching, aggregation and inference by humans and computers. An ontology seeks the classification and explanation of entities. (Hastings, 2017). CIDOC-CRM and DOLCE are examples of ontologies used in the humanities. Learn here more about the use of ontologies in Geovistory.
Persistent Item: A persistent item is an entity that persists over a period, but does not have a time dimension in itself. Persistent items are characterized by events (temporal entities) that add a time dimension to a persistent item. For example the event "birth" characterizes the beginning of the existence of a person (a person is a persistent item).
Properties: Properties are connections between entity classes. Properties link entities together. For example, a person is linked, via the property "has gender", with the class "gender".
Subclass: A subclass is inferior to its parent class. For example "ship" is a subclass of "man-made object". When X is a subclass of Y it inherits all the properties of the class Y. What is more, a subclass can have additional properties compared to its parent class. In other words, it can be linked to ship-specific classes. For example, a ship might be linked to a "ship voyage" or to people that acted as its crew.
Temporal entity: A temporal entity is an event with a time dimension. Temporal entities characterize persistent items (entities without time dimension). For example, the temporal entity "birth" characterizes the beginning of existence of a person (persistent item).
Type: A type is similar to a subclass. For example, "nickname" is a type of "naming". Note that by definition all types of a specific class share the same properties.
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